North Carolina Eminent Domain / Land Condemnation

Real Estate Attorneys Assisting Residents of North Carolina

The state of North Carolina is home to many notable universities and colleges, including Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Wake Forest University. While its capital is located in Raleigh, its largest city is Charlotte. Residents and visitors alike can enjoy attractions such as the Contemporary Art Museum of Raleigh, the North Carolina Museum of Art, and a Museum of Natural Sciences. Individuals who purchase property in the state sometimes may face the prospect of the government exercising its power of eminent domain, when it takes private property for public use. At Grimes Teich Anderson, our property lawyers have helped many residents of North Carolina pursue the compensation that they deserve in these circumstances.

Protect Your Rights During the Eminent Domain Process

Under the U.S. Constitution, as well as the North Carolina Constitution, the government cannot take private property for public use unless it pays the property owner. The power of eminent domain may be exercised by a wide range of entities, including the federal government, states, counties, and cities. In some cases, it may also be utilized by agencies created by the government, such as a public utility company or the Department of Transportation. Regardless of whether a traditional government entity takes the land, or a private entity takes it, two central requirements must be met. The taking must be for public use, and the property owner must receive just compensation.

The term “condemnation” is used to refer to the government’s exercise of the eminent domain power. A land condemnation begins by filing a complaint or petition in the county in which the property is located. Property owners can defend themselves or have a lawyer represent them in a land condemnation action. Inverse condemnation may occur when the government damages private property without filing an eminent domain taking or paying just compensation. The property owner then can sue the government in an effort to require it to exercise eminent domain. For example, a farm owner may sue the state to officially take control of his or her land under this power if a state project in the area polluted the land to the extent that its value has been significantly reduced, and the state has not offered compensation.

Under the North Carolina Constitution and the North Carolina General Statutes, a landowner is legally entitled to “just compensation.” This typically means that the entity choosing to exercise the power of eminent domain and condemn a property must pay the individual fair market value, which is defined as the amount of money that a willing buyer would pay for the property to a willing seller.

Consult a North Carolina Lawyer When Facing Condemnation

At Grimes Teich Anderson, our dedicated eminent domain litigation attorneys can help protect the rights of North Carolina property owners facing government takings or trying to sue for inverse condemnation. We can carefully explore the details of your situation and represent you diligently throughout the process. We closely monitor the status of each case and keep our clients informed at every step of the way. With offices throughout North Carolina, we represent residents of communities such as Asheville, Franklin, Rutherfordton, Waynesville, and Spruce Pine. To set up an initial appointment with us, you can contact us online or call us at 828-766-7700.

Each case is different, so not all information on this website, as well as some which may not be provided, will apply to every case. Because the facts and relevant laws are different from case to case, Grimes Teich Anderson does not guarantee that the outcome, results or experiences with one lawyer or one case will be similar to another.

**Except for Employment Law Cases, Attorney’s fees are a percentage of the entire recovery and will be deducted before other expenses. In addition to the fee in these cases, Client will be responsible for litigation expenses, which will either be deducted from the recovery or paid by the client. Some Employment Law Cases may be handled on a contingent fee basis and others handled on an hourly basis, where the client is billed for the hours spent on the case. Based on our experience, we will advise you of the most appropriate fee arrangement in Employment Law cases.

Material on this website is for information purposes and is not legal advice.

Client Reviews
★★★★★
Mr. Anderson represented my husband, Duane Carter during a recent car accident claim. We were try to get the medical bills and pain reimbursement resolved with the insurance company. They were great at keeping us current with any progress or problems that occurred during the process of our claim. The law firm of Grimes, Teich & Anderson are very people oriented and care deeply about their clients. I would highly recommend anyone in a similar situation use this law firm to resolve their claim.
★★★★★
We received exceptional assistance with a very difficult situation. Jessica Leaven and her team were thorough and clear throughout the entire process. We are grateful for her assistance and would recommend her to others who are seeking simple guidance or formal representation. Rebecca H.
★★★★★
Henry Teich is an outstanding attorney who aggressively represented me in a complex workers compensation injury case. Hank has been handling WC injury cases for may years and knows all the new NC statutes concerning WC! Tony M.
★★★★★
My husband and I would like to extend a heartfelt "thank you" to Jeffrey Martin, Tasha and Meagan. My husband worked hard, his entire life and could never get what he truly deserves, but, because of Jeff he received a fair settlement. We are so thankful, and were so blessed to have Jeff Martin represent us. Michelle L.